Granada Les Paul Copy Reviews 4

Been playing guitar for over 30 years. These days it's mostly 12 string in Church services. But I still play my electrics, mostly blues type stuff these days.

Like the previous reviewer, (with a difference) I bought it in 1977 from the United Conservatory of Music (Based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) It was their house brand. I was a student of theirs. So I'm sure it's the same guitar--or at least close.

It looks good--other than the cream pickguard-it looks better without it. It was a decent student level guitar.

As with the other reviewers the pickups are quite weak. -The guitar sounds out of tune at the higher frets no matter how well you do the intonation. -The hardware is cheap--some of mine has been replaced.

That flame top the previous reviewers rave about does look quite nice. (Although some students had ones that were a bit bland.) But if they look at it closely they'll see it's not solid maple, but a veneer of wood & what looks like plastic. Also where the body arches the highest there is a gap between the main body and the top. Because of this the pickups can sit loosely in the guitar-this could have contributed to the feedback the first reviewer mentions.

The previous reviewer wrote-"An absolute first rate guitar." and "So what you esentialy have is A LES PAUL! AS good or better than any made with the GIBSON logo...never give it up!" Well I have both this copy & a real Les Paul. I also know other people with various Les Pauls--the real thing is quite superior. There is no comparsion. The tone my Les Paul has is way better than the copy and the guitar itself is much sturdier. This is not only due to the pickups, but also the construction. The copy has a bolt-on neck which affects the tone & sustain. (I have nothing against bolt on necks-but they do affect the sound.) Also the nature of the top I mentioned above also affects the tone compared to the real thing. Still the first reviewer probably got a good deal, but may have been able to get one for less. If you only have a couple of hundred to spend it may not be a bad deal. But be prepared to do some minor work on it (or have somebody else do it.) As a student level guitar it's okay, and my rating reflects that I consider this a student level guitar, otherwise it would have been lower.

zontar rated this unit 3 on 2007-10-21.

Ive been playing about 25yrs.Sraight ahead rock n roll and R&B. With flame top.

I bought in 1977 from the United Conservatory of Music (Based in Medicine Hat Alberta Canada) as my first "good Guitar" It was thier house brand.

The weight and solid resonance were amazing.I could not appreciate at the time how god this guitar was.Electrics were reliable and sturdy.

The privioys revier is right. The stock pickups were a tad weak.BUT always came through in my item. Maybe the former owner of his had replaced with junky ones. The tail strap post kept coming out but was easily fixed. Input jack plate too..but very well made and easy to fix(normal wear and tear)

Construction is amazing..simple, and high quality mahogany and flame maple top.Beautiful on stage.Thickest stop bar ive ever seen on a LP copy.So nice I kept the pick gaurd off to show off the maple!

An absolute first rate guitar. Mostly for the previous poster here is some history on what he has. I actually contacted the founder of the school where I bought this .In west canada.GRANADA was a house brand for the school.They were made in the mid 70's and early 80's at ( get this) the Aria Pro plant in Japan! By the same factory and the same people that made the Aria pro 2.AT that time. To the highest quaility. So what you esentialy have is A LES PAUL! AS good or better than any made with the GIBSON logo...never give it up! As far as I know they were only made in natural blonde flame maple with a black head stock plate and Granada in MOP.You have the best.With the right pick ups you should be able to tell it from a vinatge LP. It may be better.

Nichole Pryce rated this unit 5 on 2006-04-18.

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